Membership/Donate

Daily Archives: January 6, 2016

2016 Fishing Regulations Summary available online

 

A new year means new seasons ahead, and it’s never too early to start planning. Anglers with an itch to get the low-down on all things fishing related in Kansas this year should check out the online version of the 2016 Kansas Fishing Regulations Summary. Simply visit ksoutdoors.com and click “Fishing / Fishing Regulations” to download your copy of the free, easy-to-use, full-color pamphlet. Printed copies will be available wherever licenses are sold by mid-January.

Apart from a helpful section highlighting new regulations for the 2016 season, the summary also includes information on important fishing regulations such as special seasons, creel and length limits, license fees and legal fishing methods. Because creel and length limits vary from lake to lake, the2016 Kansas Fishing Regulations Summary is a must-read for all anglers.

The summary also lists all public waters, along with their location and any special regulations in effect. At the turn of a page, anglers can see which community lakes don’t charge extra fees for fishing, as well as community lakes designated as Family Friendly Facilities (FFF) that will include flush toilet facilities, security patrols, security lighting, easy access to the water and do not allow alcohol.

Anglers can also read up on aquatic nuisance species (ANS), as well as regulations governing the use of live baitfish. Select pages are devoted to fish identification, featuring color illustrations by renowned fish illustrator Joe Tomelleri. Current state record fish are listed, and there is also a Master Angler Award Application for anglers who catch fish that qualify for this certificate award program.

For more information on Kansas fishing, visit www.ksoutdoors.com/Fishing .

2016 Fish Consumption Advisories issued

 

The Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) and the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism (KDWPT) are issuing revised fish consumption advisories for 2016. The advisories identify types of fish or other aquatic animals that should be eaten in limited quantities or, in some cases, avoided altogether because of contamination. General advice is also provided to aid the public in making informed decisions regarding the benefits as well as the risks associated with eating locally caught fish from Kansas waters.

Statewide Advisories

The following consumption restrictions are recommended because of mercury in fish:

Women who are pregnant, may become pregnant, or are nursing and children age 17 or younger should restrict consumption of all types of locally caught fish, from waters or species of fish not specifically covered by an advisory, to one meal per week because of mercury.

Women who are pregnant, may become pregnant, or are nursing and children age 17 or younger should restrict consumption of largemouth, smallmouth, and spotted bass (black basses) to one meal per month because of mercury.

The general public (men and women 18 or older)should restrict consumption of these species to one meal per week because of mercury.

Recommendations include not eating specified fish or aquatic life from the following locations:

  1. The Kansas River from Lawrence (below Bowersock Dam) downstream to Eudora at the confluence of the Wakarusa River (Douglas and Leavenworth counties); bottom-feeding fish such as buffalo, carp, carpsuckers, catfishes (except flathead catfish), sturgeons, and suckers because of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).
  2. The Spring River from the confluence of Center Creek to the Kansas/Oklahoma border (Cherokee County); shellfish because of lead and cadmium.
  3. Shoal Creek from the Missouri/Kansas border to Empire Lake (Cherokee County); shellfish because of lead and cadmium.
  4. Cow Creek in Hutchinson and downstream to the confluence with the Arkansas River (Reno County); bottom-feeding fish such as buffalo, carp, carpsuckers, catfishes (except flathead catfish), sturgeons, and suckers because of PCBs.
  5. The Arkansas River from the Lincoln Street Dam in Wichita downstream to the confluence with Cowskin Creek near Belle Plaine (Sedgwick and Sumner counties); bottom-feeding fish such as buffalo, carp, carpsuckers, catfishes (except flathead catfish), sturgeons, and suckers because of PCBs.
  6. Antioch Park Lake South in Antioch Park, Overland Park (Johnson County); all fish because of the pesticides dieldrin, heptachlor epoxide, chlordane, and dichlorophenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs).

Consumption of bottom-feeding fish such as buffalo, carp, carpsuckers, catfishes (except flathead catfish), sturgeons, and suckers should be restricted to one meal per month from the following location because of PCBs:

  1. The Little Arkansas River from the Main Street Bridge immediately west of Valley Center to the confluence with the Arkansas River in Wichita (Sedgwick County).

Women who are pregnant, may become pregnant, or are nursing and children age 17 or younger should consider restricting their total mercury intake for both supermarket fish and locally caught species. Concerned parents and other persons may wish to consult with a physician about eating fish and mercury exposure. Mercury exposure can be reduced by limiting the consumption of large predatory fish.  Larger/older fish of all types are more likely to have higher concentrations of mercury. Avoid the consumption of fish parts other than fillets, especially when eating bottom-feeding fish. Fatty internal organs tend to accumulate higher levels of fat-soluble contaminants such as chlordane and PCBs than fillets. Consumers can reduce their ingestion of fat-soluble contaminants such as chlordane and PCBs by trimming fat from fillets, and cooking in a manner in which fat drips away from the fillet. In waterbodies where watches or warnings related to harmful algae blooms have been applied, fish should be consumed in moderation and care taken to only consume skinless fillets. Avoid cutting into internal organs and rinse fillets with clean water prior to cooking or freezing.

To view the advisories online and for information about KDHE’s Fish Tissue Contaminant Monitoring Program, visit www.kdheks.gov/befs/fish_tissue_monitoring.htm

Application period for Unit 4 spring turkey permits Jan. 12-Feb. 12

 

It may not be spring yet, but it’s time to prep like it is. The application period for those looking to hunt turkeys in Unit 4 this spring begins Jan. 12. Spring turkey permits are sold over-the-counter or online for all but the southwest portion of Kansas, Unit 4. A limited number of permits are issued to residents only through a lottery drawing. Hunters can apply online only, or over the phone, from Jan. 12-Feb. 12 by visiting ksoutdoors.com. Hunters may apply for a Unit 4 Spring Turkey Permit or a Unit 4 Spring Turkey Permit/Game Tag Combo; however the game tag will only be valid in Units 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6.

 

Five hundred Unit 4 permits will be made available for the 2016 spring season, with half of those permits designated as landowner/tenant permits. Kansas youth (15 and under) may purchase a spring turkey permit valid statewide over the counter or online and will not need to enter the Unit 4 draw. Unit 4 spring turkey permits are also valid in adjacent Units 1, 2, and 5.

 

Unit 4 Spring Turkey Application Fees:

General Application: $32.50

Landowner/Tenant Application: $20.00

General Combo Permit/Game Tag Application: $42.50

Landowner/Tenant Combo Permit/Game Tag Application: $25.00

Nonresident Tenant Application: $ 37.50

Nonresident Tenant Combo Permit/Game Tag Application:  $50.00

Preference Point only: $6.50

 

There is a $6.50 nonrefundable application fee. Unsuccessful applicants will receive a refund check and be issued a preference point. If you do not want to apply for a permit and want to purchase a preference point only, you may do so online by selecting Spring Turkey Preference Point Application. Only one point may be obtained per year.

 

Any individual who has purchased a Spring Turkey Permit is eligible for one Second Turkey Game Tag. Game tags are valid in Units 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6 ONLY.

 

The spring turkey season will open April 1-12 for youth and hunters with disabilities, and April 4-12 for archery hunters. The regular spring season is April 13-May 31.

 

For more information, visit www.ksoutdoors.com, or call (620) 672-5911.

Prescribed Burning Workshop

 

The Jackson County Firefighter Association is hosting a prescribed burning workshop on Jan. 13, 2016 at 7 p.m. at the Holton Fire Department, 301 West 4th in Holton.

Prescribed burning workshops are conducted in cooperation with K-State Research and Extension, the Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism. Workshops are designed to help participants understand the nature and behavior of fire. Topics covered include reasons for burning, wildlife and prescribed burning, local and state regulations, fire weather, safety, liability, using burn contractors, as well as planning and conducting a burn.

This course will cover the new burn permit system implemented Jan. 1, 2016 in Jackson County. For more information, call (785) 364-3123.

Trapping and predator calling workshop at Tuttle Creek State Park

 

Tuttle Creek State Park will host a trapping and predator calling workshop on January 9, 2016. The class will be held from 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the state park office, 5800 A River Pond Rd, Manhattan. There is no cost or preregistration required to attend.

 

The class is designed for trappers and hunters of all ages and skill levels, from beginners to seasoned hunters. Instructors will introduce the sport to those new to trapping and calling as well as provide some brush-up skill for those with experience.

 

Kansas is home to 14 furbearer species that may be hunted and trapped during the furbearer season, including badger, bobcat, gray fox, least weasel, long-tailed weasel, mink, muskrat, opossum, raccoon, red fox, striped skunk, and swift fox. Beaver and otter may also be trapped.

 

Although coyotes are not classified as furbearers, they may be hunted and trapped year-round.

 

This class will not certify participants for a furharvester education certificate, but information provided will be beneficial for those interested in completing a furharvester education class in the future. The Kansas Furharvester Education course can be completed online at www.ksoutdoors.com/Services/Education/Furharvester.

 

For more information on this class, contact park manager Todd Lovin at (785) 539-7941.